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Digital projectors

A digital projector example

A digital projector connects to the monitor port on a desktop computer or on the external monitor port on a laptop.  It then sends whatever is on the computer screen and projects it onto a projector screen.  The majority of digital projectors also allow you to connect video sources such as DVD players and satellite systems.  You can switch between computer and video inputs using the projector remote control.

The first thing to look for when buying is the ANSI lumens rating.  This is the brightness of the projector.   A typical slide projector is around 1,000 ANSI lumens, so anything over 1,000 ANSI lumens should be fine in any room that has the lights dimmed and where the audience is no more than around 30 people.  Double this for larger audiences.

The next thing to look at is the number of pixels which will be a value like 800x600, 1024x768, 1280x720, etc.  The more pixels the better the quality of the image.  However, you also need to consider the shape of the projector's pixels, i.e. the aspect ratio.  For example, a resolution of 800x600 pixels is a 4:3 aspect ratio as the width of the image is 800 compared a height of 600.  This is a standard non-widescreen image. 

Lamp life is a big consideration.  The cost of replacement projector lamps can be several hundred pounds, which can be as much as buying a new projector, so go for one with several thousand hours.   We would also recommend making sure that any projector you buy has a 3 year warranty.

Below is just a quick selection of the cheapest digital projectors available, so that you can get an idea of costs.  Many of these are comparable with the higher end of the slide projector prices.  We have excluded the new 'Pico' projectors which are not designed to showing pictures to rooms full of people.

Model

ANSI

Weight

 Pixels Colour Manufacturer Lamp Cont. Tech HD 3D HDMI Additional                                 

Price

 

lumens

kg

    warranty life ratio   ready ready port    
Optoma DX349

3000

2.17

1024x768 Black 2 year RTB 3000 20000 DLP No No Yes  

£295

Hitachi CP-DX301

3000

2.3

1024x768 White 3 year swap out 4500 8000 DLP No Yes Yes  

£300

Hitachi CP-EX252N

2700

3.1

1024x768 White 3 year swap out 5000 2000 LCD No No Yes  

£315

Viewsonic PJD5255

3300

2.1

1024x768 Black 3 year swap out 5000 20000 DLP No Yes Yes New curved design

£315

BenQ MX507

3200

1.8

1024x768 Black 2 year RTB 2000 13000 DLP No Yes No 3D Ready

£325

BenQ MW529

3300

1.9

1280x800 White 2 year RTB 4000 13000 DLP Yes Yes Yes Long lamp life

£330

Infocus IN114x

3200

2.45

1024x768 Black 2 year RTB 4500 15000 DLP No Yes Yes 3D Ready

£330

Optoma W330

3000

2.2

1280x800 White 1 year RTB 5000 20000 DLP No Yes Yes Full 3D

£335

BenQ MX528

3300

1.9

1024x768 White 2 year RTB 4500 13000 DLP No No No  

£340

Viewsonic PJD5555W

3000

2.1

1280x800 Black 3 year swap out 5000 20000 DLP No Yes Yes New curved design

£340

Optoma X340P

3100

2.2

1024x768 Black 3 year de/re-install 5000 15000 DLP No No Yes Public sector

£345

InFocus IN116x

3200

2.45

1280x800 Black 2 year RTB 4500 15000 DLP No Yes Yes  

£350

Optoma X345

3200

2.4

1024x768 White 2 year RTB 5000 22000 DLP No Yes Yes  

£350

Sony VPL-DX220

2700

2.7

1024x768 White 3 year RTB 3000 3000 LCD No No Yes  

£350

NEC M271X

2700

2.99

1024x768 White 3 year swap out 2000 3000 LCD No No Yes  

£370

Hitachi CP-X2541WN

2700

3

1024x768 White 3 year swap out 2000 10000 LCD No No Yes  

£380

Sony VPL-DX127

2600

2.6

1024x768 White 3 year RTB 3000 3000 LCD No No Yes Networkable

£380

Sony VPL-DX147

2600

2.6

1024x768 White 3 year RTB 3000 3000 LCD No No Yes  

£380

Canon LV-X320

3200

2.5

1024x768 White 3 year RTB 4000 2300 DLP No No Yes  

£385

Sony VPL-DW122

2600

2.5

1280x800 White 2 year RTB 5000 3000 LCD No No Yes  

£390

BenQ TW529

3300

1.9

1280x800 White 2 year RTB 4500 13000 DLP No Yes Yes  

£395

Optoma W340P

3100

2.2

1280x800 Black 3 year de/re-install 5000 20000 DLP No Yes Yes Public sector

£400


Please visit www.multimediaprojectors.co.uk for our full range of projectors.   Page last updated: Tuesday 21 February 2017.

The 'Tech' column, which is usually LCD or DLP is just the technology used to display the projection image.  It's like comparing a petrol and a diesel car.  Both are cars and get you from A to B, so don't worry too much about this value.

The 'Cont. ratio' column, which is contrast ratio is a value that shows the difference number between projecting the colour blank and projecting white on the screen.  The higher the value, then better the colours.  However, many manufacturers measure this in a different way, so don't worry about this too much.

An HDMI port is the combined audio/video port that is on most modern LCD televisions.  This is only useful to you, when projecting digital pictures, if your notebook or desktop computer also has this port. 

If you have existing slides you will want to convert these to digital images to put on your computer and then you can project them.  See Convert slides to digital photos.